Julian Reichelt, the editor-in-chief of the popular German newspaper Bild—with a current circulation of about 1.37 million copies daily—has made a public apology for fearmongering society for the past 18 months with the newspaper’s coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic. He made a point to apologize to the children of the world who were told: “that they were going to murder their grandma” if they were near her. Reichelt said the top-rated Bild’s coverage was “like poison” and “made you feel like you were a danger to society.”

In his speech delivered on camera, Reichelt announced that Bild, published by the Axel-Springer Publishing Company, dared to say what Germany’s Federal Government and Chancellor Merkel have failed to say as he asked his readers for forgiveness. He remarked, “We ask for your forgiveness for a year and a half of politics, who sacrificed you.” 

As reported by UncoverDC, peaceful protests against the COVID-19 lockdowns, mask requirements, and pending vaccine passports are taking place around the world, including in Germany. Tens of thousands of individuals are standing up for their right to make personal medical decisions. Reichelt, recognizing the immense propaganda in his apology, noted how calm and conservative voices had been kept out of the pandemic conversation. He remarked how those moderate voices “were never invited to the table.” Pleading with viewers, Reichelt stressed that they “don’t believe this lie,” adding:

“To the millions of children in this country for whom our society is responsible, I want to express here what neither our government nor our Chancellor dares tell you. We ask you to forgive us. When a state steals the rights of a child, it must prove that by doing so, it protects him against concrete and imminent danger. This proof has never been provided. It has been replaced by propaganda presenting the child as a vector of the pandemic.”

Reichelt took a leave of absence from the paper earlier this year following allegations of misconduct at work. However, after finding insufficient evidence to warrant action, Reichelt was reinstated in his role at Bild on March 12 following a four-week internal inquiry into complaints about his relationships with female employees and accusations of abuse of power. Mathias Döpfner, the chief executive of Springer, said in a statement:

“[Mr. Reichelt] made mistakes. However, having assessed everything that was revealed as part of the investigation process, we consider a parting of the ways to be inappropriate.”

Saying he was “very sorry” at the time, Reichelt indicated he would  “do everything in my power to work on an equal standing with Alexandra Würzbach and work together with all of my colleagues as a team to create and exemplify a new corporate culture for Bild.”

Advocating in his video for authorities to open schools and sports halls instead of polling stations, Reichelt cautioned that those who force cruel lockdown measures “will have on their conscience and will leave in the history books, a multitude of innocent souls.” He resolutely stated:

“Forgive us for this policy which, for a year and a half, has made you victims of violence, neglect, isolation, and loneliness.”

“We persuaded our children that they were going to murder their grandma if they dared to be what they are, children. Or if they met their friends. None of this has been scientifically proven.”