There have been many questions about the 2020 general election and the irregularities in several states. Georgia has been one of those states whose election was anything but regular. We’ve covered a lot of Georgia’s election “issues,” including paying Dominion $2,000,000 to help run the election and perform the legally required testing of their voting machines; to ordering 1,000,000 absentee ballots days before the election with no time to mail them, not to mention they never even ordered envelopes.

Recently, even the Governor of Georgia, Brian Kemp, who has, until now, refused to acknowledge any election problems, has been unable to continue ignoring the obvious. Kemp sent a letter to the State Election Board saying the Secretary of State’s hand count was discredited and recommended they investigate. Governor Kemp’s actions directly resulted from a tenacious Georgia voter, Joseph Rossi, who found problems with the Secretary of State’s results and demanded answers. There’s undoubtedly more to come soon from Mr. Rossi.

In addition to all those revelations, there’s one that’s been in the open this whole time, and it is damning.

The Secretary of State appeared on the Today Show the day after the election. The hosts were asking about the not-yet-determined Georgia election results. At the time, the presidential race stood like this:

Raffensperger then appeared on the show and answered questions as to the state of the election. Raffensperger explains that there were 4.7 million total votes in Georgia. Then he specifically says:

“We have about 2% left to go, and you can see where we are right now with the results that have been reported. I don’t think they’ll change any outcomes, but that’s what those people that make those predictions do. What we’ll do….”

The call is dropped. A few minutes later, Raffensperger is back on, and the host asks:

“You said you have 2% left to count. You didn’t think, however, that it would be changing the outcome. Is that based on your analysis of where those votes are outstanding, or are you just guessing it because of the fact that it’s only 2%?

Raffensperger emphatically responds with:

We don’t guess. What we do is report. We just see where the candidates are right now in both Presidential, Congressional, and Senatorial, and you look at how many votes are out there. Even if one of the candidates got 100%, it wouldn’t be enough to move it one way or the other.

Raffensperger is right. The difference was 103,705 votes, with Trump in the lead. The 2% remaining was only approximately 94,000 votes. If you add the totals reported, plus the 94,000 outstanding, the total comes to 4,759,119 votes, or 4.75 Million (Exactly what Raffensperger claimed).

But the election ended with much more:

It is important to note that the Secretary of State purchased a new state-of-the-art electronic portal for absentee ballots that were implemented for the 2020 election. The system tracks all ballots incoming, outgoing, and processing to keep a live track of ballots. He has real-time accurate numbers.

The deadline to apply for an absentee ballot was October 30th, and the State had exact figures of how many ballots were requested and where in the voting chain each ballot was. So after crediting the voter—which basically means we’ve received your ballot “In the mail” —the numbers were already known. As of November 3rd, 2020, all that’s left is to count is the votes—which doesn’t alter the total ballot count.

On the morning of election day, The Today show screenshot shows the total at 92%.

The Secretary of State is updating the public to advise that they are now up to 98% complete, which is 4.7m x 2% = ONLY approx. 94,000 left to count and adamant they will be finished by that evening; however, it appears as the night and the following day extended, so too did the percentage and numbers of the votes left to be counted.

Below is a report from CNN on November 4th at 8:54 p.m., which states that according to Secretary of State Raffensperger, there are now 122,535 left to count with 26,815 counted in the last 30 minutes alone:

However, they didn’t finish the count until November 7th, three days later. With all votes for election day and early voting uploaded on election night, it only leaves the absentee ballots to finalize. So the question remains—where did all these extra absentee ballots come from? All 298,000 of them!

More to come soon.

***Narelle Brigden contributed to this report***