A leaked internal corporate statement from Dell Technologies, Inc. reveals a newly issued COVID-19 drug mandate effective December 1. “Team members who fail to comply with the requirements of this Policy will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.” There is no mention of medical or religious exemption.

UncoverDC was approached by a Dell employee on Tuesday on a condition of anonymity. Photos of a computer screen displaying the internal memo were provided.

Dell Mandate Memo Corporate by UncoverDC

 

The new policy requires that all employees “working on or in connection with a U.S. Federal Government contract or contract-like instrument, regardless of work location” be “Fully Vaccinated for COVID-19, and provide written proof of their COVID-19 vaccine immunization status” no later than December 8.

The source from inside Dell, who reached out to us, said, “That is extremely ambiguous, and it could be argued that a substantially large portion of the U.S. Dell workforce provides some type of support for Dell Federal.” Employees who work remotely are not exempt.

Dell’s policy includes employees whose “work includes supporting the work of Dell Federal,” who have access to the ‘Dell Federal Network,’ or those who have been “Fed vetted.” It also includes those who visit “any place… in which any Federal executive department or agency conducts official business.” Those “whose work requires them to be [where] they may come into contact with Dell Federal team members” are similarly required.

“Team members may provide a digital copy of such records, including, for example, a digital photograph, scanned image, or PDF of such record.” Employees unable to “provide evidence that they are Fully Vaccinated” or are unsure if the company expects them to take the experimental drugs “should open a My HR case.” Employees that claim “extenuating circumstances that make them unable to be Fully Vaccinated by the deadline me[sic] be granted a temporary unpaid leave to enable sufficient time to become Fully Vaccinated.”

The proof of having injected the required drugs must come in the following form:

“A copy of the record of immunization from a health care provider or pharmacy, a copy of the COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card (CDC Form MLS-319813_r, published on September 3, 2020), a copy of medical records documenting the vaccination, a copy of immunization records from a public health or State immunization information system, or a copy of any other official documentation verifying vaccination with information on the vaccine name, date(s) of administration, and the name of health care professional or clinician administering vaccine.”

Employees are considered ‘Fully Vaccinated’ by the policy document “two weeks after they have received the second dose in a two-dose series, or two weeks after they have received a single-dose vaccine.” It says updates to the policy could be forthcoming in the event the CDC determines a time limit should apply. The policy is “designed to comply with the COVID-19 Workplace Safety Guidance for U.S. Federal Contractors and Subcontractors… issued on September 24, 2021.”

“Dell Human Resources is responsible for administering and enforcing this Policy,” according to the document, which shows owner “Global HR Services.” This version of the policy was “Approved By… Marie Moynihan, SVP HR Services and Operations,” while “Legal Review” came from “Jennifer Morrison, VP U.S. Federal Legal.”

Disclaimers on the policy include a reservation of the right to “revise[] or revoke[]” it “at any time, with no advance notice,” and to “make exceptions to this policy in its discretion.” It states that the policy “is a statement of Dell’s intent only and does not create contractual rights” and that “The Guidance is designed to require as many people as possible to get vaccinated and interpretation of scope should keep in mind this underlying goal.”

Southwest Airlines Pilots filed a lawsuit to halt COVID drug mandates by their employer. A temporary restraining order has blocked United Airlines from mandating drugs on its employees in a class-action lawsuit. Employees across the nation are pushing back against mandates through lawsuits and resignations.