Clark County officials denied certification of a county commission race in Nevada yesterday. Clark County Registrar of Voters Joe Gloria found 139 discrepancies in District C. The Clark county race between Democrat Ross Miller and Republican Stavros Anthony yielded a razor-thin margin of only 10 votes. Former secretary of state Miller received 76,586 votes and Anthony, a Las Vegas city councilman, who is term-limited, received 76,576. The 139 discrepancies were sufficient to dispute the results.

The Nevada Current reports that “Clark County Attorney Mary-Anne Miller told commissioners a court would likely rule against the county’s certification of the results and require a special election.”

A canvass of Clark County found a total of 936 discrepancies, “including 710 in mail precincts, 121 in early voting precincts, and 105 in Election Day precincts.” Those discrepancies included duplicate votes, mail ballot issues, and early voting and election day issues.

Also, there were issues with provisional ballots, 2,243 of which were rejected. Clark County Commissioner Larry Brown motioned to accept the race results except in County Commission C, where the results were so close.

Gloria emphasized that the Clark County Commission District C race yielded discrepancies he cannot reconcile, casting doubt “on whether or not the margin of victory is solid.” The county is currently discussing its options but seems to be leaning toward a special election.

Former Acting Director of National Intelligence Rick Grenell believes that there are more than 936 instances of fraud in Nevada. He maintains that the “Harry Reid machine” has long intimidated people into not investigating further instances of criminal activity in elections in Nevada.

Grenell’s recent article in Jordan Sekulow’s constitutional law firm ACLJ publication describes a “lingering problem” in Nevada regarding its election integrity. He said that confidence in election results is low. The factory tolerance settings on the Agilis machines often used incorrectly capture signatures, and the “rushed” manual verification process often excludes monitors from the campaigns.

Grenell also said that discussions with Clark County officials made the Trump campaign believe that “roughly 150,000 to 200,000 mail-in ballots were authenticated solely through the Agilis machine”—without any further human oversight. Grenell continued, “[s]tate and county officials refused to work proactively to ensure the 2020 ballot box wasn’t exposed to this massive vulnerability. In fact, Clark County Registrar of Voters Joe Gloria made clear he can’t act on the claims because his office doesn’t have an investigatory team.”

President Trump tweeted “big victory”, saying that votes on the “same ballot as President” were thrown out because of “large scale voter discrepancy” and mentioning low confidence by local county officials in “their own election security.”

Finally, columnist Victor Joecks of the Las Vegas Review Journal wrote that he tested Nevada’s signature verification process for the mail-in ballots and found the system “wide open for fraud.” Nine people participated in a test that simulated “what might happen if someone returned ballots that didn’t belong to him or her…[e]ight of the nine ballots went through. In other words, signature verification had an 89 percent failure rate in catching mismatched signatures.” Gloria had assured Joecks that he had full confidence that signature match safeguards put in place would identify discrepancies on the ballots.

Joecks wrote that “[c]ounty officials aren’t working proactively to determine whether unscrupulous actors abused this vulnerability in a widespread fashion.” Gloria stated that he doesn’t have “an investigatory team” and that fraudulent votes are “caught when they’re reported to us.”