GOP Chairwoman Kelli Ward exposed what she called “breaking information” and “the big router lie” in her daily update Monday. She explains that “no software routers would be used, only hardware routers.” 

As reported on May 6 by UncoverDC, Maricopa county failed to deliver subpoenaed admin passwords and routers to the auditors for the ongoing Maricopa County forensic audit. Maricopa County Attorney Joseph LaRue wrote a letter to the liaison for the audit, Ken Bennett, on May 3. UncoverDC reported:

“The letter states that the Maricopa County attorney could not deliver the promised ‘virtual images’ of the routers because they could not adequately redact ‘confidential law enforcement data.’ According to the letter, there were also concerns that handing over the routers could put ‘sensitive, confidential data belonging to Maricopa County citizens such as health information and social security numbers.’”

Ward explains why this is a lie,

“Hardware routers are a separate, dedicated piece of equipment with fast networking and limited disk storage…Only the rawest of rookie network technicians would install additional applications and data files on a router…they are trained that a router is a single-purpose machine to used to route, used to route packets of data. A router would never be used as a database server because the disk storage would not support a database server, especially for an entity as large as Maricopa County…there is no danger when making a copy of the router hard drive.”

This may be true; however, the router would allow a user/hacker to access/deny ACLs (Access Control Lists) if they have any. This would indicate which range of IPs are allowed to access the router to make changes. If someone could gain access to a router, then they can do significant damage. It may be that Maricopa County is concerned with exposing the security protocols for the routers—which may expose vulnerabilities.

Notably, it seems that Dominion had sole access to the tabulators during the adjudication process in Maricopa County. It may be one reason Maricopa County does not have access to the admin passwords.

Nov. 30 testimony/Jan Bryant

Testimony was given by Janice (Jan) Bryant during the Arizona Election Integrity Hearing on Nov. 30, 2020, and she indicated that only Dominion had access to the software on the tabulators. The full transcript of her testimony can be found here. In reference to the tabulation, Bryant said:

“So I’m, I was in the tabulation center six different days—day and night shifts. And no county employees, no IT people, no one else was touching any of the software. They (Dominion) did all the training for the adjudicators; they ran all the reports. And I brought this up on my very first day in the room. I said this doesn’t seem right, as a person with my background. Never in a million years would I turn my company’s most important things over to someone else. And there’s only two guys (Dominion’s Bruce & John), and they had whole control of everything.

I also participated in the (2%) random ballot selection for hand audit. Picking the ballots, you know, determining which bins we were going to select. And even that, Dominion ran the report for it (which bins to pull).”

UncoverDC spoke with Rep. Mark Finchem on Monday. Finchem was one of the prime organizers and interrogators for the Nov. 30 hearing. In fact, he had several questions for Bryant during the hearing. His observation is a pertinent one:

“The bigger questions are, I thought there was no internet access? And why was Dominion permitted to have access to them if there was sensitive law enforcement information in them?”