On May 28, Arizona Governor Doug Ducey vetoed 22 bills—many of which were “supported by a majority of Arizonans,” according to Rep. Mark Finchem, who is now running for Secretary of State. Many of them were much-needed election integrity bills that Finchem and his colleagues have been working on for months. Finchem appeared on Bannon’s War Room on May 28—episode 984, telling Bannon that Ducey’s decision was like a “man-child temper tantrum.”

Gov. Ducey Vetoes 22 Bills/azgovernor.gov

UncoverDC spoke with Rep. Finchem on Monday and here is what he had to say about Ducey’s decision and the people of Arizona:

“Legislation doesn’t just happen; it is brought forth by constituents, through their representatives and senators. For Doug Ducey to disrespect them and their efforts to protect our children and the integrity of our elections is a disgrace. He is angry because the appropriating authority in our state government, the House of Representatives, objected to classic pork-barrel spending when the people of Arizona need relief. His action to veto bills dealing with critical race theory and election integrity is a disgrace.”

Some of the bills, mostly which leaned Partisan-Republican, that were thrown out in the name of fiscal responsibility included:

  • SB1022 is, in part, a bill for the unborn with clarifying statutory language. It also addresses the transfer of remains from hospitals and abortion clinics. (Partisan-R)
  • SB1030 is a mental health bill. Summary: “Guilty except insane; court jurisdiction.” (Partisan-R)
  • SB1074 is a governance bill related to audits in cities and towns and has language pertaining to Critical Race Theory programs and policies. (Partisan-R)
  • SB1119 has to do with the Attorney General, review of and possible exemption from federal executive orders, taxation, unconstitutional legislative authority. (Partisan-R)
  • SB1121 a marijuana and security bill with clarifying language for all things marijuana; packaging, licensing, operations, etc. (Partisan-R)
  • SB1127 speed limits based on locations, urban, school, business, highway, etc. (Partisan-R)
  • SB1135 Elections bill—counting, adjudication, ballots, machines. (Slight Partisan R 5-2)
  • SB1176 Rules for supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (Partisan-R 5-0)
  • SB1215 “Liquor; sales; delivery; identification information” (Partisan-R)
  • SB1408 “Medical marijuana; research; mental health” (Partisan-R)
  • SB1514 “Emergency shelter beds; seniors” (Slight Partisan-D 34-19)
  • SB1526 “Prisoners; training; individual certificates” (Partisan-D)
  • SB1635  Revised statutes on licensing of “adjusters, qualifications, exemption” (Partisan-R)
  • SB1716 “Arizona state hospital; admission; governance” identification of patients, surveillance, psychiatric review council, rules and guidance related to mental health issues(Partisan-R)
  • HB2001 State lottery rules
  • HB2070 Adoption rules (Partisan-R)
  • HB2296 DUI, Restricted License, Suspension (Partisan-R)
  • HB2303 “Marijuana; laboratories; proficiency testing” (Partisan-D)
  • HB2414 “National popular vote; interstate agreement” to elect the President by popular vote. Assigned to House Rules Committee on April 22, 2019 (Partisan-D)
  • HB2554 Election bill amendments, election interference by officials or with voting equipment, polling place rules (Partisan-R)
  • HB2674 Sex offender registration; termination of registration for sex offenders if certain requirements are met. (Partisan-R)
  • HB2792 Election law on early ballots and requirements, definitions, timing, military, etc. (Partisan-R)

Rep. Finchem is not alone in his frustration with Ducey. He says Republicans are relatively unanimous in their anger over the vetoes. When asked what the recourse is now, he told UncoverDC that the move on Ducey’s part is unifying and that they won’t give up.

Senate President Fann told the press that it may “actually set things back” according to a tweet by @azcapmedia and accompanying reporting by Tuscon.com.

Fann stated the following, per reporting by Tuscon.com:

“Many of the 22 bills he vetoed on Friday were crafted and sponsored by lawmakers who were the most supportive of the $12.8 billion spending plan and $1.9 billion in tax cuts. And all Ducey managed to do is annoy his friends. Many of these members are the ones that have been team players with getting the budget together,” Fann said, trying to get other Republican holdouts on board. So to veto their bills to try and send a message just was not fair,” she said. “I don’t know what they were thinking.

Speaker Rusty Bowers told Tuscon.com that Ducey’s decision “kind of unifies people in one way [and]… makes them uniformly mad.”

Press aide C.J. Karamargin stated that the governor “believes the legislature should do its job…and wanted to send a message”, referring to the two-week recess announced by legislators that would mean they would convene again on June 10. “They knew that the deal was in the process,” Karamargin said. “So, knowing that, would you pick that time to go on vacation?”—per reporting by Tuscon.com.

Fann stated, “It made no sense to keep the legislative session open…I can’t have them come in every single day and sit around while everybody is still trying to convince one person to vote on the budget,” Fann told reporters.